The Beat Chicago

This Day In History – June 8th

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This Day In History – June 8th

This Day In History is a daily feature on The Beat Chicago

There have been thousands of these days in the past and more to come.

Each day of the week we look in the rearview mirror for a look back in time. Let’s go back in time to all the events, birthdays, and more that have happened on June 8th in the past.

We’re here to help you remember everything you forgot so what could be better than a history of events that have happened on this day!

Each day of the week, The Beat Chicago takes you back through the years to see all the birthdays, heavenly birthdays and major events that have impacted life here on Earth on this day in history.

Click here and we’ll take you for a detailed trip back in time in our Backspin section.  Our Backspin section takes you back in time highlighting all the biggest events of each year.

We start Backspin in 1970 and go all the way to 1999. We’ve cataloged all the biggest news stories, top movies, TV shows, sporting events and more to help you remember everything you forgot or, help you learn something you didn’t know.

Click here for all past episodes of This Day In History

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Let’s go back in time to see everything that happened on this day in history

In A.D. 632, the prophet Muhammad died in Medina.

In 1845, Andrew Jackson, seventh president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tennessee.

In 1920, the Republican National Convention opened in Chicago; its delegates ended up nominating Warren G. Harding for president.

In 1939, Britain’s King George VI and his consort, Queen Elizabeth, arrived in Washington, D.C., where they were received at the White House by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

In 1948, the “Texaco Star Theater” made its debut on NBC-TV with Milton Berle guest-hosting the first program. (Berle was later named the show’s permanent host.)

In 1966, a merger was announced between the National and American Football Leagues, to take effect in 1970.

In 1967, during the six-day Middle East war, 34 American servicemen were killed when Israel attacked the USS Liberty, a Navy intelligence-gathering ship in the Mediterranean Sea. (Israel later said the Liberty had been mistaken for an Egyptian vessel.)

In 1978, a jury in Clark County, Nevada, ruled the so-called “Mormon will,” purportedly written by the late billionaire Howard Hughes, was a forgery.

In 1995, U.S. Marines rescued Capt. Scott O’Grady, whose F-16C fighter jet had been shot down by Bosnian Serbs on June 2. Mickey Mantle received a liver transplant at a Dallas hospital; however, the baseball great died two months later.

In 1998, the National Rifle Association elected actor Charlton Heston to be its president.

In 2003, frustrated and angry over delays, a coalition of the nation’s mayors meeting in Denver asked federal officials to bypass state governments and give them the money they needed to beef up homeland security.

In 2010, North Korea’s highest court sentenced American journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee to 12 years’ hard labor for trespassing and “hostile acts.” (The women were pardoned in early August 2009 after a trip to Pyongyang by former President Bill Clinton.) In 2015,

Pope Francis welcomed the Israeli and Palestinian presidents to the Vatican for a remarkable evening of peace prayers.


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